All Events

from Wednesday
November 21, 2018 to Monday
December 31, 2018
Show events for:
Instructions for subscribing to Stony Brook Math Department Calendars

 Month     Agenda 

Monday
November 26, 2018

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM
5-127
Student Differential Geometry Seminar
Zhongshan An, Stony Brook University
Moduli and convergence theory of Einstein metrics

TBA


Tuesday
November 27, 2018

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Math Tower P-131
Colloquium
Theodore Drivas, Princeton University
TBA


Wednesday
November 28, 2018

4:00 PM
Math Tower 5-127
Analysis Student Seminar
Jessica Maghakian, Stony Brook University
Ito's Formula and Stochastic Differential Equations

We state and prove Ito's formula and define Stochastic differential equations and state an existence/uniqueness result for them.


Wednesday
November 28, 2018

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Math Tower P-131
Algebraic geometry seminar
Jason Starr, Stony Brook University
Symplectic Invariance of Rational Surfaces on Kaehler Manifolds

Gromov-Witten invariants are manifestly symplectically invariant and count holomorphic curves of given genus and homology class satisfying specified incidence conditions. The corresponding differential equations for holomorphic *surfaces* are not well-behaved and do not give invariants. Nonetheless, I will explain how the symplectically invariant Gromov-Witten theory can produce covering families of rational surfaces in Kaehler manifolds, e.g., every Kaehler manifold symplectically deformation invariant to a projective homogeneous space has a covering family of rational surfaces. The key input is a positive curvature result for spaces of stable maps proved jointly with de Jong.


Wednesday
November 28, 2018

2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Math Tower P-131
Mini Course / Dynamics Learning Seminar
Dimitrios Ntalampekos, Stony Brook University
Non-removability of the Sierpinski gasket (part II)

I will sketch a proof that the Sierpinski gasket is non-removable for quasiconformal maps. The first step of the argument is the construction of a non-Euclidean sphere, called a "flap-plane", that arises by attaching infinitely many rectangles to the Euclidean plane. The second step of the construction is to embed quasisymmetrically this flap-plane back to the Euclidean plane, by using the Bonk-Kleiner uniformization theorem. I will provide some details of these arguments, and discuss the properties of the "flap-planes", as well as possible generalizations.


Thursday
November 29, 2018

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Math Tower P-131
Colloquium
Kristen Hendricks, MSU
TBA


Thursday
November 29, 2018

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Math Tower 5-127
Seminar in Topology and Symplectic Geometry
Yoosik Kim, Boston University
Immersed two-spheres and SYZ of Grassmannians

SYZ mirror symmetry has provided a geometry way to understand mirror symmetry via duality of a Lagrangian torus fibration. In this talk, we discuss how to deal with the most generic singular SYZ fiber, an immersed sphere. Using Floer-theoretical machinery, we complete the SYZ mirror constructed from a smooth torus. As an application, we discuss how to construct Rietsch’s Lie-theoretical mirror of Grassmannians of two planes by using Floer theory. This is based on joint work with Hansol Hong and Siu-Cheong Lau.


Friday
November 30, 2018

2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Math Tower P-131
Dynamical Systems Seminar
Christopher J. Leininger, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Polygonal billiards, Liouville currents, and rigidity

A particle bouncing around inside a Euclidean polygon gives rise to a biinfinite "bounce sequence" (or "cutting sequence") recording the (labeled) sides encountered by the particle. In this talk, I will describe recent work with Duchin, Erlandsson, and Sadanand, in which we prove that the set of all bounce sequences---the "bounce spectrum"---essentially determines the shape of the polygon. This is consequence of our main result about Liouville currents on surfaces associated to nonpositively curved Euclidean cone metrics. In the talk I will explain the objects mentioned above, how they relate to each other, and give some idea of the proof of the main theorem.


Friday
November 30, 2018

4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
P-131 Math Tower
Geometric Analysis Learning Seminar
Jiasheng Teh, Stony Brook University
Deformation of Complex Structures

Deformation of Complex structures of Riemann surfaces was first considered by Riemann in his memoir on Abelian functions in 1857. However, the general theory for deformation of higher dimensional complex manifolds was established only much later by Kodaira and Spencer in the 1950s. In this talk, we present an overview for the basic notions and results in deformation theory. In particular, main ideas for proving the existence and completeness theorems will be given. We will end the talk with a discussion of Tian-Todorov unobstructedness theorem for Calabi-Yau manifolds.


Friday
November 30, 2018

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Math Tower 5-127
Thesis Defense
Edward T. Bryden, Stony Brook University
Stability of the positive mass theorem for axisymmetric manifolds

Based on the formulation of general relativity, our intuition leads us to expect a close relationship between the ADM mass of an asymptotically flat Riemannian manifold and its geometry. In their celebrated Positive Mass Theorem, Schoen and Yau proved that if an asymptotically flat manifold has non-negative scalar curvature, then the ADM mass is non-negative. They also proved that the only asymptotically flat Riemannian with non-negative scalar curvature and zero mass is Euclidean space, as one would suspect for physical reasons. It is natural to ask whether manifolds with small mass must be close to Euclidean space in some way. This question has been answered in the affirmative for a number of special cases of Riemannian manifolds. This thesis focuses on the collection of simply connected axisymmetric asymptotically flat manifolds. These manifolds are both flexible enough that they model a wide range of interesting physical situations, and restricted enough to have useful special properties. Namely, they have naturally defined and globally valid coordinate systems and a formula which expresses their ADM mass as an integral of non-negative quantities over the manifold. Furthermore, it is assumed that the manifolds under consideration satisfy one of two additional technical hypotheses. It is then shown that a small ADM mass implies that their metric coefficients are close to the metric coefficients of Euclidean space in cylindrical coordinates with respect to the Sobolev norm.


Wednesday
December 05, 2018

2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Math Tower P-131
Mini Course / Dynamics Learning Seminar
Kenneth Bromberg, University of Utah
TBA

TBA


Wednesday
December 05, 2018

4:00 PM
Math Tower 5-127
Analysis Student Seminar
Silvia Ghinassi, Stony Brook University
SLE: Definition and Basic Properties

We will define SLE two ways and discuss some of the basic properties it satisfies.


Wednesday
December 05, 2018

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Math Tower P-131
Algebraic geometry seminar
Shizang Li, Columbia Universtiy
\ An example of liftings with different Hodge numbers

Does a smooth proper variety in positive characteristic know the
Hodge number of its liftings? The answer is ”of course not”. However, it’s not
that easy to come up with a counter-example. In this talk, I will first introduce
the background of this problem. Then I shall discuss some obvious constraints
of constructing a counter-example. Lastly I will present such a counter-example
and state a few questions of similar flavor for which I do not know an answer.


Thursday
December 06, 2018

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Math Tower 5-127
Seminar in Topology and Symplectic Geometry
Chris Woodward, Rutgers
TBA

TBA


Friday
December 07, 2018

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Math Tower P-131
Grad / Postdoc Professional Development Seminar
Elizabeth Russell, NSA
A mathematician at the NSA

Elizabeth Russell graduated from Boston University in 2009, working under Bob Devaney. After graduating, she did a postdoc at the United States Military Academy (West Point) and then moved into a tenure-track position at Western New England University. After a year, she transitioned to the NSA where she has been for the past 5 years. Now she works in the Research Directorate as a member of the data science research group.

During this talk, Liz will discuss employment opportunities for mathematicians and statisticians at the NSA and what it's like to work for the government doing secret math. She will also talk about the roundabout path she took getting here (including the day she decided to leave academia).


Friday
December 07, 2018

2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Math Tower P-131
Dynamical Systems Seminar
Zoran Sunic, Hofstra University
TBA

TBA


Wednesday
December 12, 2018

4:00 PM
Math Tower 5-127
Analysis Student Seminar
Jae Ho Cho, Stony Brook University
SLE: Transition from simple curves to non-simple curves

To finish up the semester, we discuss the proof that SLE$(\kappa)$ transitions from being a simple curve to a nonsimple curve when $\kappa = 4$.


Thursday
December 13, 2018

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
P-131
Colloquium
Bhargav Bhatt, University of Michigan.
TBA

TBA


Show events for:
Instructions for subscribing to Stony Brook Math Department Calendars