MAT 200 Language, Logic, and Proof, Spring 2015

Here is a practice final by Julia Viro.

We have Midterm II in class on April 13. The midterm will cover Chapters 7-12 of the textbook.

We have Midterm I in class on March 9. See the Practice Midterm 1. There is going to be a review session on Saturday, March 7th from 10am till 12am in Library room W4550 by Julia Viro.

More relevant information can be found on the webpages of MAT200 Fall 2014 , MAT200 Fall 2013 , and MAT200 Summer 2004 .


Homeworks:

Homework 1 due Feb 4. Reading assignment: pp 3-29 of the textbook.

Homework 2 due Feb 11. Reading assignment: pp 30-57 of the textbook.

Homework 3 due Feb 18. Reading assignment: pp 61-88 of the textbook.

Homework 4 due Feb 25. Reading assignment: pp 89-119 of the textbook.

Homework 5 due March 4. Reading assignment: pp 123-143 of the textbook.

Homework 6 due April 1. Reading assignment: pp 144-169 of the textbook.

Homework 7 due April 8. Reading assignment: pp 144-169 of the textbook.

Homework 8 due April 29. Reading assignment: pp 170-187 of the textbook.


Class Notes:

Class 1. We have discussed the overall structure of the course as well as the following problems. Reading assignment: pp 3-29 of the textbook. Highly recommended reading: The Game of Logic by Lewis Carroll.

Class 2. We have discussed the Pigeonhole Principle as well as the following problems. Highly recommended reading: Seven Puzzles You Think You Must Not Have Heard Correctly by Peter Winkler.

Class 3. We have solved the following problems using the Pigeonhole Principle .

Class 4. We have discussed Mathematical Induction and solved the following problem. Here is another example of a proof by induction.

Class 5. We have talked more on Mathematical Induction and solved the following problems.

Class 6. We have talked about quantifiers and solved the following problem.

Class 7. We have talked about Cartesian Products and solved the following problem.

Class 8. We have talked about Functions, Injections and Surjections and solved the following problem.

Classes 9-11. We have discussed Peano axioms. See section 9.4 of the textbook.

Classes 12-14. We have discussed properties of finite sets. See chapters 10 and 11 of the textbook.

Classes 15-17. We have discussed properties of infinite sets. See chapter 14 of the textbook.





Homework is a compulsory part of the course. Homework assignments are due each week at the beginning of the wednesday class. Under no circumstances will late homework be accepted.

Grading system: The final grade is the weighted average according the following weights: homework 10%, Midterm1 25%, Midterm2 25%, Final 40%.

Textbook: An Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning, Author: Peter J. Eccles

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