MAT 312/AMS 351

Summer 2015

 
 
 

Schedule, Syllabus, General Information and Administrative Remarks

Below is the tentative schedule for MAT 312/AM 351. It will be updated according to the progress of the class. It is the students responsibility to check it regularly. 

On Fridays, the homework due the following Thursday will be posted.

Instructor:
Moira Chas moira.chas at stonybrook.edu. Office hours:  Tuesday 1-2 in 3-119 Math Tower, Tuesday 2-3 MLC, Thursday 1-2 3-119 Math Tower

Grader:
Apratim Chakraborty apratim.chakrabortyat stonybrook.edu. Office hours:  Friday 11-12 in MLC.

Meeting times:
The class meets Tu-Th 9:30:12:55 at LIbrary W4530.

Textbook: Learning Modern Algebra by Al Couco and Joseph Rotman - MAA Textbooks. Reading the assigned sections beforehand is required. We will complement this book with Abstract Algebra: Theory and Applications.

Grades policy: The final grade will be based on the midterm score (25%) the final examination (50%) and homework and class participation (25%). (Class participation means being active and present in class, asking relevant questions and working on the proposes activities)

The midterm and final will consist in problems similar to some of those of  the homework.

A student will get the better of two grades, one calculated from this weighted sum, the other based only on the (cumulative) final examination.

Homework:
Expect to spend 12 to 16 hours a week solving problems. Don’t even think about leaving the homework for the last minute. If you do, you will not have time to complete it properly. No late homework will be accepted.

The list of homework problems is posted on this webpage. These problems must be turned to your instructor every Thursday  (except for first one). It is crucial to understand how to solve these  problems to succeed in this course.


All problem sets handed in stapled. Moreover, problems must be legible and must use complete sentences, correct grammar, correct spelling, etc. Problem sets which prove too difficult for the grader to read may be marked incorrect or may be returned to the student for rewriting (as the instructor sees fit). A complete solution will include the following:

  1.  The statement of the problem

  2.  An organized presentation of ideas leading to a solution

  3.  An answer that is circled or boxed

  4.  If there is no work shown, there is no credit. In other words, an answer with no justification is not admissible (even if it is the correct answer!)

Note that the exams will be similar to the homework problems, so you can use homework problems as a practice exams.


It is encouraged to form teams of three or four students and to work together. We will try to do as many group exercises as possible in class. Several people thinking together about a problem can often see around a difficulty where one person might get stuck. (This is one reason why the ability to work well in a team is rated very highly by prospective employers. )


Please note that even if students are encouraged to discuss and work on the problems with classmates, the final write-up must be individual. Any form of academic dishonesty will be taken to the Academic Judiciary (Academic dishonesty includes presenting other persons work as your own, cutting and pasting from the internet, helping somebody to present as his or her own work that is not his or hers.)


If you do not understand how to do something, get help from your any of your instructor your grader, your classmates,  in the Math Learning Center  or at the Stony Brook Tutoring Center. Never be shy to ask your instructor or grader how to do a homework problem, even if you handed in solution that you do not understand. We will be glad to help you!.


You are responsible for collecting any graded work by the end of the course. After the end of the course, the instructor is no longer responsible for returning your graded work. If you have a question about the grade you received on a problem set or exam, you must contact grader (not the instructor).


Each problem of the written homework assignment (regardless of the level of difficulty) is worth 5 points. Only selected problems will be graded (but all posted problems must be submitted).


Any issue related to the grading of the homework should be addressed to the grader.


Homework problems grading rubric 

(By sarah-marie belcastro adapted from Emmert and Parish) The midterm and final will be graded similarly.


5: All parts of the problem are present. The solution is complete or near-complete and logically formulated. Explanations are clear, notation is correct and consistent, and conceptual understanding is apparent. The solution is not necessarily perfect; minor write-up problems, grammar errors, or arithmetic errors may be present.

4: Almost all parts of the problem are present. The solution is complete or near-complete and logically formulated. Explanations are mainly clear, notation is mostly correct and consistent, and conceptual understanding is apparent. Careless mathematical errors may be present (for example, algebra, arithmetic). An intelligent, thoughtful, but somewhat incorrect approach may receive this score. The difference between a 4 and a 5 is that a 4-solution has one significant flaw. The difference between a 4 and a 3 is that a 4-solution exhibits better conceptual understanding.

3: The solution is logically formulated with clear explanations, although one part of the problem may be missing. OR, The solution is complete and explanations are clear but there are serious logical flaws. OR, The solution may be complete and logically formulated but the explanations are unclear or lacking.
Conceptual understanding of essential ideas is adequate. Many careless mathematical errors may be present (for example, algebra, arithmetic). Details are confused or missing.

2: Explanation is lacking. OR, The solution shows serious misconceptions and some correct reasoning. OR, Many parts of the problem are not present.
Conceptual understanding is inadequate. Procedural errors are present, OR logical/relational steps are missing. The difference between a 2 and a 3 is that a 2-solution does not exhibit adequate conceptual understanding of the essential details. The difference between a 2 and a 1 is that a 2-solution has some explanation, or has some correct reasoning.

1: Explanation is completely missing. OR, Many parts of the problem are not present. OR, The solution contains serious logical flaws, and lacks some explanation.
Conceptual understanding is inadequate. Procedural errors are present, OR logical/relational steps are missing. Poor response to the questions posed.

0: Solution is missing. OR, Solution is minimal and makes no sense.



Information for students with disabilities
If you have a physical, psychological, medical, or learning disability that may impact your course work, please contact Disability Support Services at (631) 632-6748 or http://studentaffairs.stonybrook.edu/dss/. They will determine with you what accommodations are necessary and appropriate. All information and documentation is confidential.

Students who require assistance during emergency evacuation are encouraged to discuss their needs with their professors and Disability Support Services. For procedures and information go to the following website: http://www.sunysb.edu/ehs/fire/disabilities.shtml